BiTE® TECHNOLOGY

Designed to close the space between T cells and tumors

Innovation

BiTE® platform bridges the gaps in immuno-oncology

Immuno-oncology is an exciting approach to fighting cancer, harnessing the body’s own immune response to directly target cancer cells. But many patients are still left behind.1,2,3 Amgen’s innovative Bispecific T Cell Engager (BiTE®) platform hopes to advance the goals of immuno-oncology.

Amgen is committed to the relentless pursuit of breakthroughs for cancer patients and their families. We are focused on developing therapies with the goal of having transformative potential, and being off-the-shelf so they are readily available to patients regardless of their treatment setting.

Evolution of BiTE® technology in cancer research Evolution of BiTE® technology in cancer research

How it Works

Engaging the natural power of T cells with the goal of eliminating cancer

BiTE® technology is designed to activate the body’s own cancer-fighting T cells.13 Although T cells seek out malignant cells, cancer cells can often escape detection.14,15

The BiTE® molecule is bispecific, engineered from two antibodies that target specific cells. One is for a selected tumor antigen, the other for CD3 found on T cells. Once together, the BiTE® molecule is designed to engage the T cell to activate an immune response against the cancer cell.4,16,17

BiTE® technology, step by step

1

ENGAGE

The BiTE® molecule is designed to engage a T cell to a cancer cell.13,18

2

ACTIVATE

The T cell becomes activated, working to destabilize and cause the death of the cancer cell.4,18

3

ELIMINATE

Activated T cells may also target surrounding cancer cells, breaking them down as well.13,18,19

4

PROTECT

Sustained activation of a single T cell may result in expansion of memory T cells for future target against the cancer. 13,18,20

Watch as BiTE® technology is being researched in blood cancer patients around the world

The goal of BiTE® technology is to eliminate detectable cancer

BiTE® MOLECULE

How BiTE® technology engages T cells

RESEARCH

Versatile for a wide range of cancers

The BiTE® immuno-oncology platform offers potential versatility to target any tumor-associated antigen across both solid and hematologic malignancies.13 This technology has the potential to bring hope to patients.

The BiTE® platform is being investigated across a broad set of cancers and targets13

Multiple myeloma molecule

Multiple myeloma 21

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma molecule

NHL 21

Acute myeloid leukemia molecule

AML 21

GBM molecule

GBM 21

Small cell lung cancer molecule

SCLC21

Prostate cancer molecule

Prostate cancer 21

Gastric cancer molecule

Gastric or Gastroesophageal
Junction Cancer 21

AML, acute myeloid leukemia; GBM, glioblastoma; NHL, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma; SCLC, small cell lung cancer.

The BiTE® molecules under clinical investigation include the following targets:

Tumor-specific antigen–binding domain

T-cell–binding domain

BCMA

BCMA

CD19

CD19

CD33

CD33

Tumor-specific antigen–binding domain

T-cell–binding domain

DLL3

DLL3

EGFRvlll

EGFRvlll

FLT3

FLT3

Tumor-specific antigen–binding domain

T-cell–binding domain

FLT3

FLT3

PSMA

PSMA

MUC17

MUC17

CLDN18.2

CLDN18.2

BCMA, B-cell maturation antigen; CLDN18.2, Claudin-18 isoform 2; DLL3, delta-like protein 3; EGFRvIII,
epidermal growth factor receptor variant III; FLT3, FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3; MUC17, mucin 17; PSMA, prostate-specific membrane antigen.

BiTE: Bispecific T Cell Engager; CD: cluster of differentiation; HLE: half-life
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